Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Tarsus: arthroscopy

Contributor(s): Bud G E Fackelman, Graham Munroe

Introduction

  • Arthroscopy is a useful tool for both diagnosis and treatment of tarsal joint lesions   Joint: arthroscopy - overview   but it is a procedure that should only be carried out by specialists in the field.

Uses

Advantages

  • Minimally invasive with reduced trauma and fewer complications.
  • Improved visibility.
  • Multiple arthroscopies can be performed in multiple joints on one occasion.
  • Good cosmetic appearance following surgery.
  • Shorter operating time vs. arthrotomy.
  • Reduced convalescence vs. arthrotomy.
  • Better prognosis for return to previous level of performance (and beyond) vs arthrotomy.

Disadvantages

  • Expensive equipment.
  • High levels of surgical expertise, knowledge and experience of technique required.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Lesion-dependent prognosis for return to soundness and previous performance.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Fraser B & Booth T (2005) Equine arthroscopy surgery - Part 6: Tarsocrural joint. UK Vet 10 (3), 10-14.

Other sources of information

  • Ross M W & Dyson S J (2003) EdsDiagnosis and Management of Lameness in the Horse. Saunders.
  • McIlwraith C W & Robertson J T (1998)Equine Surgery Advanced techniques.2nd edn. Williams & Wilkins.


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