Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Ovary: ovariectomy - laparotomy approach

Contributor(s): David Moll, Graham Munroe, Sarah Stoneham

Introduction

  • Ovaries are removed from mares for two reasons - pathologic changes or management practices.
  • A number of different approaches and techniques are available to the surgeon.
  • Ovariectomy is associated with a higher frequency of peri-operative complications than some other elective surgical procedures.

Uses

  • Removal of ovaries bilaterally from mares not intended for breeding, ie management reasons.
  • Removal of ovarian neoplasia, see Ovary: neoplasia - overview   Ovary: neoplasia - overview  .
  • Removal of ovarian hematoma.
  • Removal of ovarian teratoma.

Advantages

  • Treatment of choice for removal of ovarian neoplasia.

Disadvantages

  • High frequency of peri-operative complications - some of which can be life-threatening.
  • Technically difficult to exteriorize ovary and ligate it.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Depends upon primary reason for surgery.
  • Guarded for behavioral reasons - although normal oestrus cycles are prevented, this may not alleviate the abnormal behavior.
  • Guarded for ovarian granulosa theca cell tumors   Ovary: neoplasia - granulosa / theca cell  .
  • Unilateral resection: mares return to estrus in mean of 8.5 months.
  • Once the normal cycle has started, fertility appears to be unaffected. Most must go through winter anestrum following tumor removal before normal cycle resumes.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Kelmer G, Raz T, Berlin D, Steinman A & Tatz A J (2013) Standing open-flank approach for removal of enlarged pathologic ovaries in mares. Vet Rec 172 (76), 687 PubMed.
  • Alldredge J G & Hendrickson D A (2004) Use of high-power ultrasonic shears for laparoscopic ovariectomy in mares. JAVMA 225 (10), 1579-1580 PubMed.
  • Boure L, Marcoux M & Laverty S (1997) Paralumbar fossa laparoscopic ovariectomy in horses with use of Endoloop ligatures. Vet Surg 26 (6), 478-483 PubMed.
  • Gottschalk R D & Van den Berg S S (1997) Standing laparoscopically-aided ovariectomy in mares. J S Afr Vet Assoc 68 (3), 102-104 PubMed.
  • Hendrickson D A & Wilson D G (1996) Instrumentation and techniques for laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery in the horse. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 12 (2), 235-259 PubMed.
  • Ragle C A, Southwood L L, Hopper S A & Buote P L (1996) Laparoscopic ovariectomy in two horses with granulosa cell tumors. JAVMA 209 (6), 1121-1124 PubMed.
  • Ragle C A & Schneider R K (1995) Ventral abdominal approach for laparoscopic ovariectomy in horses. Vet Surg 24 (6), 492-497 PubMed.
  • Doran R, Allen D & Gordon B (1988) Use of stapling instruments to aid in the removal of ovarian tumors in mares. Equine Vet J 20 (1), 37-40 PubMed.
  • Nickels F A (1988) Complications of castration and ovariectomy. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract (3), 515-523 PubMed.
  • Slone D E Jr (1988) Ovariectomy, ovariohysterectomy, and cesarean section in mares. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract (3), 145-459 PubMed.
  • Moll H D, Slone D E, Juzmiak J S & Garrett P D (1987) Diagonal paramedian approach for removal of ovarian tumors in mares. Vet Surg 16 (6), 456-458 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • McKinnon A (1993)Ovariectomy.In:Equine Reproduction. 1st edn. Lea & Febiger. ISBN: 0812114272.


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