Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Mouth: trauma lip - repair

Contributor(s): Prof Gary M Baxter, Graham Munroe

Introduction

  • Lip lacerations occur quite frequently in horses usually due to self-trauma on rigid protruding objects, eg nails or hooks.
  • The lips have a tremendous capacity for healing by second intention   Wound: healing - second intention  .
  • To achieve the best cosmetic and functional result requires surgical intervention.
  • Careful attention to basic principles of debridement, lavage and careful anatomical reconstruction is essential for a good result.

Uses

  • Repair of acute and chronic lacerations involving the upper and lower lips.

Advantages

  • Superior functional and cosmetic result.

Disadvantages

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Generally good with surgical repair - depends upon severity and age of laceration.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Smyth G B et al (1988) Delayed repair of an extensive lip laceration in a colt using an Estlander flap. Vet Surg 17 (6), 350-352 PubMed.


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