Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Jejunum: jejunojejunostomy

Contributor(s): Larry Booth, Graham Munroe, Jarred Williams

Introduction

  • Resection and anastomosis of the small intestine is a common procedure in equine gastrointestinal surgery.
  • Lesions affecting the distal jejunum and/or ileum are often treated by jejunocecostomy Jejunum: jejunocecostomy or jejunoileostomy.
  • Lesions affecting the jejunum only are treated by resection and anastomosis, usually end-to-end, or jejunojejunostomy.

Uses

Advantages

Disadvantages

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Espinosa P, Le Jeune S S, Cenani A, Kass P H & Brosnan R J (2017) Investigation of perioperative and anesthetic variables affecting short-term survival of horses with small intestinal strangulating lesions. Vet Surg 46 (3), 345-353 PubMed.
  • Stewart S, Southwood L L & Aceto H W (2014) Comparison of short- and long-term complications and survival following jejunojejunostomy, jejunoileostomy and jejunocaecostomy in 112 horses: 2005-2010. Equine Vet J 46 (3), 333-338 PubMed.
  • Freeman D E & Schaeffer D J (2011) Clinical comparison between a continuous Lembert pattern wrapped in a carboxymethylcellulose and hyaluronate membrane with an interrupted Lembert pattern for one-layer jejunojejunostomy in horses. Equine Vet J 43 (6), 708-713 PubMed.
  • Proudman C J, Edwards G B & Barnes J (2007) Differential survival in horses requiring end-to-end jejunojejunal anastomosis compared to those requiring side-to-side jejunocaecal anastomosis. Equine Vet J 39 (2), 181-185 PubMed.
  • Rendle D I, Woodt J L, Summerhays G E, Walmsley J P, Boswell J C & Phillips T J (2005) End-to-end jejuno-ileal anastomosis following resection of strangulated small intestine in horses: a comparative study. Equine Vet J 37 (4), 356-359 PubMed.
  • Boswell J C, Schramme M C & Gains M (2000) Jejunojejunal intussusception after an end-to-end jejunojejunal anastamosis in a horse. Equine Vet Educ 12 (6), 395-398 VetMedResource.
  • Latimer E G et al (1998) Closed one-stage functional end-to-end jejunoejunostomy in horses with use of linear stapling equipment. Vet Surg 27 (1), 17-28 PubMed.
  • Freeman D E (1997) Surgery of the small intestine. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 13(2), 261-301 PubMed.
  • Ross M W et al (1989) Surgical management of duodenal obstruction in an adult horse. JAVMA 194 (9), 1312-1314 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Rendle D I, Boswell J C, Walmsley J P, Phillips T J & Summerhays G E S (2004) Comparison of End-to-End Jejuno-Ileal and Jejuno-jejunal Anastomoses. In: Proc 43rd BEVA Congress. Equine Vet J Ltd, UK. pp 193.


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