Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Head: trephination

Contributor(s): Paddy Dixon, Graham Munroe, David G Wilson, Jarred Williams

Introduction

Uses

Advantages

  • Simple to carry out and requires minimal equipment.
  • Can be performed in the standing sedated horse.

Disadvantages

  • Significantly less exposure than bone flap techniques (usually 2-3 cm in diameter).
  • Multiple trephine holes may be required to increase exposure.
  • Poor cosmetic result, especially in multiple openings, and if the periosteum is not preserved at each site.
  • Aftercare of trephine holes may be resented by horse.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Good for trephination.
  • Overall dependent upon primary disease process.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Liuti T, Reardon R, Dixon P M (2017) Computed tomographic assessment of equine maxillary cheek teeth anatomical relationships, and paranasal sinus volumes. Vet Rec 181 (17), 452 PubMed.
  • Barakzai S Z, Dixon P M (2014) Standing equine sinus surgery. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 30 (1), 45-62 PubMed.
  • Gilsenan W F, Getman L M, Parente E J, Johnson A L (2014) Headshaking in 5 horses after paranasal sinus surgery.Vet Surg 43 (6), 678-84 PubMed.
  • Dixon P M, Parkin T D, Collins N et al (2012) Equine paranasal sinus disease: a long-term study of 200 cases (1997-2009): treatments and long-term results of treatments. Equine Vet J 44 (3), 272-6 PubMed.
  • Dixon P M, Parkin T D, Collins N et al (2012) Equine paranasal sinus disease: a long-term study of 200 cases (1997-2009): ancillary diagnostic findings and involvement of the various sinus compartments. Equine Vet J 44 (3), 267-71 PubMed.
  • Perkins J D, Bennett C, Windley Z & Schumacher J (2009) Comparison of sinuscopic techniques for examining the rostral maxillary and ventral conchal sinuses of horses. Vet Surg 38, 607-612 PubMed.
  • Barakzai S Z, Lane-Smyth J, Lowles J & Townsend N (2008) Trephination of the equine rostral maxillary sinus: efficacy and safety of two trephine sites. Vet Surg 37, 278-282 PubMed.
  • Barakzai S Z & Perkins J (2005) The equine paranasal sinuses - Part 3. UK Vet 10 (2), 5-11.
  • Barakzai S Z & Dixon P M (2003) Effect of sinus trephination on scintigraphy of the equine skull. Vet Rec 152 (20), 629-630 PubMed.
  • Schumacher J et al (1994) Removal of inspissated purulent exudate from the ventral conchal sinus of three standing horses. JAVMA 205 (9), 1312-1314 PubMed.
  • Ford T S (1991) Standing surgery and procedures of the head. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract (3), 583-602 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Tremaine H (2006) Sinuscopy of the Paranasal Sinuses. In: Equine Respiratory Medicine and Surgery. Eds: McGorum B C, Dixon P M, Robinson N E & Schumacher J. Elsevier Saunders, USA. ISBN: 0702027596.
  • Tremaine H (2004) Paranasal Sinus Trephination and Endoscopy in the Horse. In: Proc 43rd BEVA Congress. Equine Vet J Ltd, UK. pp 138.


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