Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Foot: hoof wall - crack repair

Contributor(s): Graham Munroe

Introduction

  • Deep cracks involving the hoof wall require stabilization and control of infection to encourage healing and resolution of lameness.
  • The defect or crack in the hoof is replaced by normal horn produced from the coronary band as it grows distally. This may take between 6-12 months, depending on the extent of the crack.

Uses

Advantages

  • Treatment of choice.
  • Usually undertaken under standing sedation.
  • Relatively inexpensive.
  • Minimal specialist equipment.

Disadvantages

  • General anesthesia may be required for deep debridement of damaged laminae/bone.
  • Time-consuming.
  • Considerable time to heal.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Good for superficial cracks and those with limited deeper resection.
  • Fair for cracks involving resection of sensitive tissue.
  • Guarded if secondary bone damage and infection.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Moyer W (2003) Hoof wall defects: chronic hoof wall separations and hoof wall cracks. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 19 (2), 463-477 PubMed.
  • O'Grady S E (2001) Quarter crack repair - an overview. Equine Vet Educ 13 (4), 216-219 VetMedResource.
  • Pardoe C H & Wilson A M (1999) In vitro mechanical properties of different equine hoof wall crack fixation techniques. Equine Vet J 31 (6), 506-509 PubMed.
  • Honnas C M (1991) Standing surgical procedures of the foot. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract (3), 695-722 PubMed.
  • Reeves M J et al (1989) Miscellaneous conditions of the equine foot. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract (1), 221-242 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Pollitt C C (1999)Colour Atlas of the Horse's Foot.Mosby, London.
  • Goodness P (1998)Composite Repair of Hoof Injuries.In:Current techniques in Equine Surgery and Lameness.2nd edn. Eds: White N A & Moore J M. Saunders, Philadelphia. pp 516-518 & 519-521.


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