Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Esophagus: esophagotomy

Contributor(s): Stephen Adams, Graham Munroe

Introduction

  • Treatment of esophageal obstruction   Esophagus: impaction  or foreign body can involve medical or surgical methods.
  • Many cases resolve spontaneously, or following simple medical treatment or gentle manipulative techniques.
  • Long-term obstructions, overzealous manipulations and irregular/sharp foreign bodies or obstructions can   →   esophageal damage and perforations, and are best treated by surgical intervention involving esophagotomy.

Uses

  • Removal of foreign bodies or other obstructions   Esophagus: impaction  of the cervical esophagus.

Advantages

  • Can be performed under standing sedation   Anesthesia: standing chemical restraint  and local anesthesia if required.
  • Few complications if performed longitudinally in region of normal esophagus with primary closure.

Disadvantages

  • Usually performed under general anesthesia.
  • If not sutured, may develop more complications including traction diverticula.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Good if longitudinal incision with primary closure in region of normal esophagus.
  • Guarded if damaged esophagus with secondary intention healing and/or esophagostomy.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • ​Fubrini S Let al(1992)Esophagus.In:Equine SurgeryEd J A Clier. WB Saunders, Philadelphia.


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