Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Cardiovascular: first pass radionuclide angiography - aortoiliacofemoral thrombosis

Synonym(s): First pass radionuclide angiography for assessment of aortoiliacofemoral thrombosis

Contributor(s): Russel Malton, Rachel Murray

Introduction

  • First-pass radionuclide angiography of the terminal aorta and branches.
  • A simple, non-invasive method providing qualitative information on blood vessel morphology and semi-quantitative blood flow data in horses with suspected aortoiliacofemoral thrombosis   Cardiovascular: aortoiliac thrombosis  .

Radiopharmaceuticals

  • A variety of radiopharmaceuticals can potentially be used, however the best images are obtained by using a radiopharmaceutical of high concentration which produces a tight bolus of activity.
  • 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) or 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (99mTc-HDP).
  • Use of these agents allows skeletal scintigraphy   Bone: scintigraphy  of the hindlimbs and pelvis to be carried out concurrently. This is especially valid when other diagnostic procedures have proved inconclusive.
  • High background activity may adversely affect image quality if immediate repeat studies are necessary because of  patient movement or malpositioning.
  • 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA) or 99mTc-sulfur colloid.
  • These agents are rapidly cleared and are useful for multiple studies.
  • 99mTc-pertechnetate (99mTcO4-).
  • Lower doses of radiopharmaceutical may be used but high background activity precludes repeat studies.

Dosage

  • The dose for 99mTc-MDP or 99mTc-HDP is as for skeletal scintigraphy Link: Bone: scintigraphy: 1 GBq/100 kg BW.
  • Lower doses can be used for the other radiopharmaceuticals: approx 1 GBq/study is suggested.

Uses

  • To assist in the diagnosis of hindlimb lameness thought to be associated with aortoiliacofemoral thrombosis. Can be used in conjunction with skeletal scintigraphy   Bone: scintigraphy  .
  • Assessment of the severity of vascular occlusion by providing qualitative information on vessel morphology and semi-quantitative information on blood flow.
  • Repeat studies may help evaluate progression of the condition and document the response to therapy.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Boswell J C, Marr C M, Cauvin E R et al (1999) The use of scintigraphy in the diagnosis of aortic-iliac thrombosis in a horse. Equine Vet J 31 (6), 537-541 PubMed.
  • Ross M W, Maxson A D, Stacy V S & Buchanon K B (1997) First-pass radionuclide angiography in the diagnosis of aortoiliac thromboembolism in a horse. Vet Radiol 38 (3), 226-230 PubMed.


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