Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Blood: collection

Contributor(s): Prof Derek Knottenbelt

Introduction

  • To provide appropriate samples for further analysis.
  • To cause minimal trauma to the animal.

Print-off the Owner facthsheet onSamples - how they help your vet  Samples - how they help your vet  to give to your client.

Uses

Advantages

  • Simple technique unless animal difficult to restrain.
  • Large range of parameters can be measured on a small sample.

Disadvantages

  • Thrombosis/thrombophlebitis - especially with repeat sampling, in toxic animals and in foals.
  • Erythrocytes may be damaged by very fine needles or vacuum tubes.
  • Possiblity of introducing infection, especially via navel vessels in foals.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Walesby H A, Hillmann D J, Blackmer J M & Williams J (2007) The transverse facial venous sinus: an alternative location for blood collection. Equine Vet Educ 19 (2), 100-102 VetMedResource.
  • Barrelet A (2004) Laboratory tests in equine practice. Part I: Introduction and sample handling. UK Vet (7), 17-20.
  • Kemble T J (1994) Alternative site to the jugular vein for serial blood sampling. Equine Vet Educ (6), 301-302 VetMedResource.

Other sources of information

  • Walesby H A & Blackmer J M (2003)How to Use the Transverse Facial Venous Sinus as an Alternative Location for Blood Collection in the Horse.In:Proc 49th AAEP Convention.pp 259-261.


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