Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Anesthesia: field anesthesia

Synonym(s): Continuous IV infusion for field anesthesia

Contributor(s): Mark Senior, Garry Stanway, Enzo Vettorato

Introduction

Uses

Indications

  • Minor surgical procedures which are likely to require <1 h total anesthetic time.
  • Small to medium sized, well mannered, healthy horses.
  • Suitable procedures include lumpectomies, castration   Testis: castration - overview   and wound management   Wound: management - overview  .

Contraindications

Advantages

  • Can be carried out away from normal practice facilities.
  • There is evidence that this technique has fewer cardiovascular depressant effects than volatile anesthetic agents.
  • Can be carried out with minimal equipment.

Disadvantages

  • Prolonged recovery times when used to maintain anesthesia for >90 min.
  • Surgical anesthesia is characterized by the retention of ocular and laryngeal reflexes so this technique is not ideal for eye or laryngeal/pharyngeal surgery.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Austin S M (2013) Assessment of the equine neonate in ambulatory practice. Equine Vet Educ 25 (11), 585-589 VetMedResource.
  • Stanway G (2000) Anaesthesia for minor surgical procedures in the horse. In Pract 23 (1), 22-26 VetMedResource.
  • Taylor P M, Kirby J J, Shrimpton D J & Johnson C B (1998) Cardiovascular effects of surgical castration during anaesthesia maintained with halothane or infusion of detomidine, ketamine and guaiphenesin in ponies. Equine Vet J 30 (4), 304-309 PubMed.
  • Van Dijk P (1996) Intravenous anaesthesia in horses by guaiphenesin-ketamine-detomidine infusion: some effects. Vet Q 16 Suppl 2, S122-125 PubMed.
  • Luna S P L, Taylor P M & Wheeler M J (1996) Cardiovascular, endocrine and metabolic changes in ponies undergoing intravenous or inhalation anaesthesia. J Vet Pharm Therap 19 (4), 251-258 PubMed.
  • Johnston G M, Taylor P M, Holmes M A & Wood J L N (1995) Confidential enquiry of perioperative equine fatalities (CEPEF-1): Preliminary results. Equine Vet J 27, 193-200 PubMed.
  • Taylor P M & Luna S P L (1995) Total intravenous anaesthesia in ponies using detomidine, ketamine and guaiphenesin: pharmacokinetics, cardiopulmonary and endocrine effects. Res Vet Sci 59 (1), 17-23 PubMed.
  • Greene S A, Thurmon M S, Tranquilli M S & Benson M S (1986) Cardiopulmonary effects of continuous intravenous infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine and xylazine in ponies. Am J Vet Res 47 (11), 2364-2367 PubMed.


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