Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Uterus: delayed involution

Synonym(s): Delayed uterine involution

Contributor(s): Madeleine L H Campbell, Charles Cooke

Introduction

  • Uterine involution in mares is rapid compared to other species.
  • Luminal epithelium of the endometrium has normally been repaired by days 4-7 post-partum.
  • Resorption of microcotyledons is normally complete by 7 days post-partum.
  • The endometrium normally has a non-gravid histological appearance by 14 days post-partum.
  • Discharge of lochia (fluid) is normally complete by 15 days post-partum.
  • The uterine horns normally return to their pre-gravid size by 32 days post-partum.
  • When these mechanisms which constitute uterine involution are delayed, pregnancy rates at the first post-partum estrus period are correspondingly decreased.
  • Cause: dystocia, retained placenta, infection, lack of exercise.
  • Signs: dullness, inappetence, mild colic.
  • Diagnosis: manual palpation, endometrial cytology/bacteriology, ultrasonography.
  • Treatment: ecbolic agents, uterine lavage, estradiol implants, exercise.

Normal mechanisms of uterine involution

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Causes of delayed involution

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Clinical significance

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Treatment

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Alternative strategy for dealing with delayed involution

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Davies Morel M C G, Newcombe J R & Hinchliffe J (2009) The relationship between consecutive pregnancies in Thoroughbred mares. Does the location of one pregnancy affect the location of the next, is this affected by mare age and foal heat to conception interval or related to pregnancy success. Theriogenology 71 (7), 1072-1078 PubMed.
  • Gündüz M C & Kaya H H (2008) The effect of oxytocin and PGF2± on the uterine involution and pregnancy rates in postpartum Arabian mares. Anim Repro Sci 104 (2-4), 257-263 PubMed.
  • Bruemmer J E, Bady H A & Blanchard T L (2002) Uterine involution, day and variance of first postpartum ovulation in mares treated with progesterone and estradiol-17² for 1 or 2 days postpartum. Theriogenology 57 (2), 989-995 PubMed.
  • Blanchard T L, Varner D D, Brinsko S P et al (1991) Effects of ecbolic agents on measurements of uterine involution in the mare. Theriogenology 36 (4), 559-571 PubMed.
  • Blanchard T L, Varner D D, Brinsko S P, Meyers S A & Johnson L (1989) Effects of postparturient uterine lavage on uterine involution in the mare. Theriogenology 32 (4), 527-535 PubMed.


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