Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Respiratory: distress - treatment and management

Contributor(s): Gayle Hallowell, Diana M Hassel

Introduction

  • Respiratory distress is a relatively commonly encountered clinical sign in practice.
  • It is diagnosed based upon labored breathing caused by an increased respiratory effort due to increased rate, depth and rhythm. Other clinical signs seen include an extended head and neck, nostril flaring Nose: flared nostrils, abdominal component to breathing (including a heave line), abducted elbows, stridor, anxiety and inactivity. Cyanosis is seen in very severe cases.
  • It can be caused by a wide variety of conditions and successful treatment relies upon an accurate diagnosis.

Pathophysiology

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • O'Neill H & Giorio M E (2010) Obstructive lesions of the equine upper respiratory tract Part 2: Surgical options and expected outcomes. UK Vet 15 (4), 4-8 VetMedResource.
  • O'Neill H & Giorio M E (2010) Obstructive lesions of the equine upper respiratory tract Part 1: Airway physiology and the establishment of a diagnosis. UK Vet 15 (3), 4-8 VetMedResource.
  • Dunkel B, Dolente B & Boston RC (2005) Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in 15 foals. Equine Vet J 37, 435-440 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Ainsworth D M & Hackett R P (2004) Disorders of the Respiratory System. In: Equine Internal Medicine. Eds: Reed S M, Bayly W M & Sellon D C. Saunders, USA. pp 289-353.


ADDED