Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Isolation

Contributor(s): The Horserace Betting Levy Board, Vetstream Ltd

Introduction

  • Isolation of a horse becomes necessary when there is either a risk of disease transmission to other horses/people/environment, or to prevent nosocomial infection of high-risk horses, such as neonatal foals.
  • Successful isolation is dependent on two main factors:
    • 1. The availability of suitable isolation premises.
    • 2. The implementation of and adherence to isolation procedures.
  • Protocols to limit the risk of spread of pathogens should be tailored to the facility and its caseload.
  • The level of barrier nursing required is determined according to the clinical findings (eg presence of diarrhea, pyrexia, nasal discharge), farm history (eg recent infectious disease or endemic diseases), and the nature of the disease (ie airborne, feco-oral transmission, etc). Barrier techniques aim to both reduce the risk of transmission of infection to other horses and to prevent contamination of the hospital staff with pathogens from the horse.

For further information in the UK see the Horserace Betting Levy Board's Guidelines on  Isolation in their Codes of Practice.

Premises

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Supplies

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Equipment

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Protective clothing

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Procedures

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Weese T S (2004) Barrier precautions, isolation protocols and personal hygiene in veterinary hospitals. Vet Clin N Am Eq Pract 20 (3), 543-559 PubMed.
  • Dwyer R M (2004) Environmental disinfection to control equine infectious diseases. Vet Clin N Am Eq Pract 20 (3), 531-542 PubMed.
  • Carpenter T E et al (1998) Risk analysis of quarantine station performance - a case study of the importation of equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses into California. J Vet Diagn Invest 10 (1), 11-16 PubMed.
  • Browning G F et al (1987) Epidemiology of equine herpesvirus 2 (equine cytomegalovirus). J Clin Microbiol 25 (1), 13-16 PubMed.
  • Zehmer R B et al (1974) Venezuelan equine encephalitis epidemic in Texas, 1971. Health Serv Rep 89 (3), 278-282 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Horserace Betting Levy Board (2016) Codes of Practice. 5th Floor, 21 Bloomsbury Street, London WC1B 3HF, UK. Tel: +44 (0)207 333 0043; Fax: +44 (0)207 333 0041; Email: enquiries@hblb.org.uk; Website: http://codes.hblb.org.uk.


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