Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Farriery: natural balance shoeing

Synonym(s): Natural balance hoof care, balance shoeing

Contributor(s): Graham Munroe, David Nicholls, Haydn Price

Introduction

  • The principles of natural balance hoof care are an accumulation of common sense ideas about hoof care that have been supported anecdotally and by scientific scrutiny.
  • The study and observation of self-maintaining equine feet in both wild and domestic environments are the basis from which scientific research has been directed.
  • Traditional theories on hoof care and lameness treatment are constantly being challenged in an effort to further our knowledge, improve our ability, maintain normal feet, treat lameness and most importantly prevent lameness.
  • Natural balance is not so much a single technique of trimming and shoeing, but a combination of simple guidelines that addresses the basic needs of the equine digit (wild, domestic, shod or barefoot).
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Goals of natural balance shoeing

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Why is the heel landing first with initial frog contact important?

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Issues surrounding natural balance shoeing

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Conclusion

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Natural balance shoe types

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Bowker R M et al (1998) Functional anatomy of the cartilage of the distal phalanx and digital cushion in the equine foot and a hemodynamic flow hypothesis of energy dissipation. Am J Vet Res 59 (8), 961-968 PubMed.
  • Bowker R M et al (1993) Sensory Receptors in the Equine Foot. Am J Vet Res 54 (11), 1840-1844 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Stashak T S (2002) Adams Lameness in Horses. 5th edn. ISBN: 0781741955. pp 1-1174.
  • Wilson A (2001) The Effect of Shoe Type, Design and Material on the Forces Experienced in the Distal Limb. In: Proc of the Bluegrass Laminitis Symposium.
  • Denoix J (2000) The Equine Distal Limb. 1st edn. Iowa State University Press, USA.  ISBN: 0813802490. pp 1-137.
  • Ovnicek G (2000) Reading the Bottom of the Hoof. Anvil Magazine.
  • Hinterhofer C (1999) Biomechanics of the Equine Hoof Capsule Using Finite Elements Analysis (FEA). In: Proc of the Bluegrass Laminitis Symposium. Ungulates, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna.
  • Ovniceck G (1997) New Hope for Soundness. pp 1-31.
  • Jackson J (1992) The Natural Horse. pp 67-139.
  • Hagan, Page B & Ovnicek G The Breakover of the Foot and its effect on Structures and Forces within the Foot.

Organization(s)

  • Total Foot Protection Ltd, Five Oaks Road, Slinfold, Horsham, West Sussex RH13 0QW, UK. Tel: +44 (0)1403 791000; Fax: +44 (0)1403 791008; Email: mail@tfp.uk.com; Website: www.tfp.uk.com
  • Equine Digit Support System Inc, 506 Highway 115, Penrose, Colorado. USA. Tel : +1 (719) 372 7463; Email: edss@ris.net; Website: www.hopeforsoundness.com.


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