Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Cornea: laceration - perforation

Contributor(s): Dennis E Brooks, Karen Casswell

Causes

  • Corneal lacerations caused by sharp objects in the horse may be superficial or so deep that they perforate the cornea to result in iris prolapse   Iris: prolapse management  . Sharp objects cause injury at the site of the trauma   Cornea: laceration 01      Cornea: laceration 02  .
  • Corneal injuries from blunt objects cause injury at the limbus or globe equator.
  • Corneal injuries involving sharp or blunt corneal trauma are accompanied by varying degrees of iridocyclitis.
  • Iris prolapse in the horse most frequently occurs after acute ocular trauma involving sharp and perforating corneal injuries, or blunt injuries causing rupture of the cornea, limbus, or sclera.
  • Corneal perforation can also occur secondary to rapid enzymatic degradation of stromal collagen and ground substance associated with infectious and non-infectious ulcerative keratitis   Keratitis: traumatic / ulcerative  .

Therapy for non-perforating lacerations

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Therapy for perforating corneal lacerations with iris prolapse

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Principles of corneal microsurgery for corneal perforation and iris prolapse

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Prognosis

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Chmielewski N T et al (1997) Visual outcome and ocular survival following iris prolapse in the horse: A review of 32 cases. Equine Vet J 29 (1), 31-39 PubMed.
  • Lavach J D, Severin G A & Roberts S M (1984) Lacerations of the equine eye: A review of 48 cases. JAVMA 184 (10), 1243-1248 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Gilger B C (2005) Ed. Equine Ophthalmology. W B Saunders, USA. ISBN: 0721605222.
  • Brooks D E (2002) Ophthalmology for the Equine Practitioner. Teton New Media, USA. ISBN: 1893441512.
  • Brooks D E & Matthews AG (1999) Equine Ophthalmology. In: Veterinary Ophthalmology. Ed: Gelatt K N. 4th edn. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN: 0683300768.
  • Brooks D E & Wolf E D (1983) Ocular trauma in the horse. Equine Vet J Suppl 2. pp 141-146.


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