Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Anesthesia: monitoring - overview

Contributor(s): Dennis R Gieser, Craig Johnson, Mark Senior, Vetstream Ltd

Introduction

  • Equine patients are more difficult to anesthetize safely than either small animals or humans. For this reason effective monitoring is a vital part of any anesthetic procedure.
  • Monitoring as close to continuously as possible, with correct interpretation of results, can warn of impending problems and emergencies.
  • A wide variety of equipment exists to aid monitoring of anesthesia in the horse, but it is still important to use the 'hands-on' approach and your own clinical skills, rather than relying totally on the equipment.
  • The body systems which are the particular subjects of monitoring are the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems.
  • Maintaining a good written anesthetic record is essential, both to aid in the detection of undesirable trends and also for legal reasons, should anything go wrong during the procedure.
  • The aims of monitoring anesthesia in the horse are to maintain an adequate depth of anesthesia for the surgical procedure and to ensure that all body systems are functioning correctly.

Clinical techniques

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Use of monitoring equipment

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Other variables

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers
  • Recent references fromPubMed.
  • Mee A M, Cripps P J & Jones R S (1998)A retrospective study of mortality associated with general anesthesia in horses - emergency procedures. Vet Rec142(12), 307-309PubMed.
  • Trim C M (1998)Monitoring during anesthesia - techniques and interpretation. Equine Vet Educ10(4), 207-218.
  • Riebold T W (1990)Monitoring equine anesthesia. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract6(3), 607-624PubMed.
  • Young S (1989)Monitoring the anesthetized horseEquine Vet Educ1(1), 45-49.

Other sources of information

  • McDonell W N & Dyson D H (1990)Monitoring the Anesthetized Horse.In: Current Practice of Equine Surgery.Eds: White N A & Moore J N. Lippincott. pp 87-93. ISBN: 0-397-50937-5.


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