ISSN 2398-2977      

Tibial nerve: paralysis

pequis
Contributor(s):

Introduction

  • Tibial paralysis is very uncommon, partly because the nerve is well protected by the muscles and bones of the limb.
  • Cause: trauma.
  • Signs: hypermetric, stringhalt-like gait with flexion of the hock at rest.
  • Diagnosis: pelvic limb lameness.
  • Treatment: DMSO, corticosteroids, surgery.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • The tibial nerve is a distal branch of the sciatic nerve.
  • This branch supplies the flexor muscles of the tarsus and extensor muscles of the digits.
  • Injury to the tibial nerve leads to alteration in function of the gastrocnemius and digital flexor muscles.
  • Paralysis results in extension of the tarsus and flexion of the fetlock and interphalangeal joints.

Timecourse

  • Atrophy of the gastrocnemius muscle can occur.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

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