Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Tarsus: distal tarsal bone fracture / luxation

Contributor(s): Prof Gary M Baxter

Introduction

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Stress/trauma.

Predisposing factors

General
  • Fast work, eg racig, pacing, trotting.

Specific

  • Occasionally secondary to previous fusion of centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints.
  • Wedge-shaped conformation of dorsolateral aspect of the third tarsal bone may predispose to fracture.
  • Comminuted fractures more common in central tarsal bone.

Pathophysiology

  • Dorsomedial or sagittal fractures of central tarsal bone; dorsal and dorsolateral margin of third tarsal bone.
  • May be bilateral.
  • May cause luxation/subluxation of tarsometatarsal joint   Tarsus: luxation  .
  • Incomplete fractures of central/third tarsal bone may not prevent racing and only present after several bouts of lameness.
  • Bilateral third tarsal bone fractures may present as poor performance rather than lameness and look old on radiography.
  • Fractures may or may not extend to an articular surface.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Bertone A L (1994)Management of orthopedic emergencies.Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract10(3), 603-625 PubMed.
  • Jakovljevic S, Gibbs C & Yeats J J (1982)Traumatic fractures of the equine hock, a report of 13 cases.Equine Vet J14(1), 62-68 ) PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Dabareiner R G (2003)The Tarsus.In:Diagnosis and Management of Lameness in the Horse.Eds: Ross M W & Dyson S J. Saunders, Missouri. pp 444-447.


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