Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Orbit: neoplasia - primary

Contributor(s): Clare Knottenbelt, Prof Derek Knottenbelt, Paul E Miller, Graham Munroe, Anna Hollis

Introduction

  • Cause: uncommon ocular disorder, primary or secondary extension neoplasia.
  • Signs: progressive exophthalmos, protrusion of third eyelid, exposure keratitis; may have visual deficit if optic nerve involved.
  • Diagnosis: physical examination, ultrasonography, histopathology.
  • Treatment: depending on size of tumor - excision, exenteration, euthanasia.
  • Prognosis: depends on type and stage of neoplasia.
  • See also Eye: neoplasia overview Eye: neoplasia - overview.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Primary tumors

  • Adenocarcinoma.
  • Neuroepithelial carcinoma.
  • Lipoma.
  • Medulloepithelioma.
  • Melanoma Eye: neoplasia - melanoma.
  • Meningioma.
  • Osteoma.

Secondary tumors

  • Local extension from surrounding structures is the most common, eg SCC of the ocular/adnexal tissue, or paranasal sinus tumors.
  • Rarely metastasis from distant primary site, eg multicentric lymphosarcoma.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Henson F M D & Dobson J M (2004) Use of radiation therapy in the treatment of equine neoplasia. Equine Vet Educ 16 (6), 315-318 VetMedResource.
  • Baptiste K E & Grahn B H (2000) Equine orbital neoplasia - a review of 10 cases (1983 - 1998). Can Vet J 41 (4), 291-295 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Knottenbelt D C, Patterson-Kane J C & Snalune K L (2015) Clinical Equine Oncology. Elsevier, London.


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