Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Navicular bone: fracture

Contributor(s): Steve Adair, Simon Curtis, Vetstream Ltd

Introduction

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Predisposing factors

General
  • Navicular disease.

Pathophysiology

  • Primary trauma.
  • Secondary to navicular disease where the bone is demineralized; abnormal soft tissue attachments disrupt function   →   stress risers in the bone.
  • Fracture leads to inflammation, pain, swelling and heat in the area.
  • As a sesamoid bone, the navicular is subject to constant movement by the deep digital flexor tendon   →   lack of stability   →   no spontaneous healing.

Timecourse

  • Chronic lameness is to be expected following fracture.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Claerhoudt S (2013)Distal navicular border fragments: Clinically significant or not, that is the question.Equine Vet Educ25(7), 352 VetMedResource.
  • Colles C M (2011)Navicular bone fractures in the horse.Equine Vet Educ23(5), 255-261 VetMedResource.
  • Lillich J Det al(1995)Fracture of the distal sesamoid bone in horses - 17 cases (1982-1992).JAVMA207, 924-927 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Honnas C M (1999)The foot.In:Equine Surgery.Eds: J A Auer & J A Stick. Philadelphia: W B Saunders Co. pp 789-790.


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