Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Nasolacrimal duct: obstruction - acquired

Contributor(s): Paul E Miller, Graham Munroe

Introduction

  • Cause: stenosis and/or occlusion of the nasolacrimal duct (NLD) system can be a complication of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic or traumatic disease processes within, or external to, the system.
  • Signs: epiphora and/or ocular discharge plus those related to the primary disease process.
  • Diagnosis: aided by NLD flushing and catheterization.
  • Treatment: of primary cause is essential plus NLD cannulation and flushing with antibiotic/corticosteroid solutions.
  • Prognosis: dependent upon primary cause.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Internal

External

Pathophysiology

  • Stenosis and/or occlusion of the nasolacrimal duct system may occur as an acquired complication of various disease processes within the drainage system or external to it.
  • The NLD system is particularly exposed to internal and external sources of obstruction due to:
    • Its anatomy - close proximity to facial bones and paranasal sinuses, narrow lumen and tortuosity.
    • Its function as a drainage conduit for the eye allowing concentration of bacteria, debris and other agents.
    • Its connection with the ocular and respiratory systems allowing two potential sources of contamination.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references fromPubMedandVetMedResource.
  • McIlnay T R, Miller S M & Dugan S J (2001)Use of canaliculorhinostomy for repair of nasolacrimal duct obstruction in a horse.JAVMA218(8), 1323-1324PubMed.
  • Moore C P (1992)Eyelid and nasolacrimal disease.Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract8(3), 499-519PubMed.


ADDED