Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Eyelid: trauma - contusion and abrasion

Contributor(s): Dennis E Brooks, Graham Munroe

Introduction

  • Cause: blunt injuries of the eyelid without skin disruptions cause contusions, while disruption of the cutaneous epithelial barrier is an abrasion.
  • Signs: may be associated with other more serious globe or orbital injuries.
  • Treatment: rapidly respond to symptomatic treatment.
  • Prognosis: fair to good without any complications.
Print off the Owner factsheet on Common eye problems to give to your clients.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Direct blunt trauma.

Pathophysiology

  • Contusions are blunt injuries of the eyelid without skin barrier disruption whereas abrasions have loss of skin epithelial tissue.
  • Both may be associated with serious injury to the globe or orbit   Orbit: trauma  .
  • The eyelids in the horse lack dermal fatty tissue and hematomas develop readily (contusions).
  • Loss of the epithelial barrier may allow infection to establish with possibilities of orbital cellulitis   Orbit: cellulitis  or retrobulbar abscess   Orbit: retrobulbar abscess  formation.
  • Lid abscesses may also occur.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Moore C P (1992) Eyelid and nasolacrimal disease. Vet Clin N A Equine Pract (3), 499-519 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Brooks D E (1999) Equine Ophthalmology. In: Veterinary Ophthalmology.Ed: Gelatt K N. 3rd edn. 1053-1116.


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