Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Eyelid: trauma

Contributor(s): Keith Barnett, Dennis E Brooks, Graham Munroe, William C Rebhun

Introduction

  • Common in all ages and types.
  • Cause: often self-inflicted, upper eyelid, and may involve other surrounding structures.
  • Signs: varying in severity from small punctures to large flaps.
  • Diagnosis: history, signs, radiography.
  • Diagnosis: history, signs.
  • Treatment: surgical repair is preferred in most cases.
  • Prognosis: guarded to good - dependent upon size of lesion and speed of treatment.
Print off the Owner factsheet on Common eye problems to give to your clients.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Trauma.

Pathophysiology

  • Commonly caused by sharp or blunt direct trauma to eyelids, bites, or tearing after eyelids caught on nails or fence wire.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Krohne S G (1996) Equine ocular emergencies. Equine Pract 18 (2), 15-22 VetMedResource.
  • Moore C P (1992) Eyelid and nasolacrimal diseaseVet Clin N A Equine Pract (3), 499-519 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Brooks D E (1999) Equine Ophthalmology. In: Veterinary Ophthalmology. Ed: Gelatt K N. 3rd edn. 1053-1116.


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