Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Eyeball: strabismus

Synonym(s): Squint

Contributor(s): Keith Barnett, Dennis E Brooks, Graham Munroe

Introduction

  • Signs: deviation of the globe from the proper axis for a given species.
    Neonates and adults have different normal positions
  • Cause: congenital and acquired forms exist - the latter related to neurologic problems such as vestibular disease or trauma.
  • Treatment: has been described in congenital forms.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • Strabismus is a deviation of the globe.
  • The primary lesion in congenital forms is thought to be at the level of the cranial nerve nuclei.
  • Abnormal eye position and movement is also seen in cases of congenital blindness (central and peripheral) - this is not a permanent strabismus.
  • Acquired eye deviations are usually secondary to other neurologic diseases especially vestibular syndromes and will resolve with improvement in the primary condition.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Gelatt K N and McClure J R (1979) Congenital strabismus and its correction in 2 Appaloosa horses. J Equine Med Surg 3, 240-244.


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