Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Therapeutics: skin

Contributor(s): Kyle Braund, Maggie Fisher, Linda Horspool, David Scarff

Introduction

  • Skin disease can be treated topically and/or systemically. The choice between topical and systemic therapy, or combination of these, is usually dependent on the diagnosis. For example, topical treatment is the preferred route for flea infestations and for surface pyoderma. On the other hand, systemic therapy is usually used for superficial and deep pyoderma Skin: deep pyoderma and for atopic dermatitis Skin: atopy. Topical and systemic therapy may be combined, such as in the treatment of flea allergic dermatitis Skin: flea bite hypersensitivity.
  • Agents used in the treatment of skin disease include anti-allergic or anti-inflammatory drugs, eg corticosteroids, antimicrobials Therapeutics: antimicrobial drug (antibacterials, antigungals), antiparasitics Therapeutics: parasiticide and immunomodulators Therapeutics: immunological preparation.
    *Indicates product not licensed for this use in this species.

Dermatological vehicles for topical preparations

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Anti-inflammatories and antihistamines

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Anti-infective skin preparations

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Keratolytic and keratoplastic agents

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Disinfectants and cleansers

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from VetMed Resource and PubMed.
  • Bonneau S et al (2009) Therapeutic efficacy of topical hydrocortisone aceponate in experimental flea-allergy dermatitis in dogs. Aust Vet J 87, 287-291 PubMed.
  • Nuttall T et al (2009) Efficacy of a 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray in the management of canine atopic dermatitis: a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Vet Dermatol 20, 191-198 PubMed.
  • Six R et al (2008) Efficacy and safety of cefovecin in treating bacterial folliculitis, abscesses, or infected wounds in dogs. JAVMA 233, 433-439 PubMed.
  • Toma S et al (2008) Efficacy and tolerability of once-daily cephalexin in canine superficial pyoderma: an open controlled study. JSAP 49, 384-391 PubMed.
  • Ginel P J, Garrido C, Lucena R (2007) Effects of otic betamethasone on intradermal testing in normal dogs. Vet Dermatol 18, 205-210 PubMed.
  • Rybnícek J, Hill P B (2007) Suspected polymyxin B-induced pemphigus vulgaris in a dog. Vet Dermatol 18, 165-170 PubMed.
  • Stegemann M R et al (2007) Clinical efficacy and safety of cefovecin in the treatment of canine pyoderma and wound infections. JSAP 48, 378-386 PubMed.
  • Bensignor E, Grandemange E (2006) Comparison of an antifungal agent with a mixture of antifungal, antibiotic and corticosteroid agents for the treatment of Malassezia species otitis in dogs. Vet Rec 158(6), 193-195 PubMed.
  • Scott D W, Peters J, Miller W H Jr (2006) Efficacy of orbifloxacin tablets for the treatment of superficial and deep pyoderma due to Staphylococcus intermedius infection in dogs. Can Vet J 47(10), 999-1002 PubMed.
  • Curtis C F, Lamport A I, Lloyd D H (2006) Masked, controlled study to investigate the efficacy of a Staphylococcus intermedius autogenous bacterin for the control of canine idiopathic recurrent superficial pyoderma. Vet Dermatol 17(3), 163-168 PubMed.
  • Horspool L J et al (2006) Clinical efficacy of two ibafloxacin formulations in the treatment of canine pyoderma. Vet Rec 158(7), 236-237 PubMed.
  • Rougier S et al (2005) A comparative study of two antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory formulations in the treatment of canine otitis externa. Vet Dermatol 16(5), 299-307 PubMed.
  • Cobb M A et al (2005) Topical fusidic acid/betamethasone-containing gel compared to systemic therapy in the treatment of canine acute moist dermatitis. Vet J 169(2), 276-280 PubMed.
  • Horspool L J et al (2004) Treatment of canine pyoderma with ibafloxacin and marbofloxacin-fluoroquinolones with different pharmacokinetic profiles. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 27(3),147-153 PubMed.
  • Saevik B K et al (2004) A randomized, controlled study to evaluate the steroid sparing effect of essential fatty acid supplementation in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis. Vet Dermato l15(3), 137-145 PubMed.
  • Dickin S K et al (2003) Efficacy of selamectin in the treatment and control of clinical signs of flea allergy dermatitis in dogs and cats experimentally infested with fleas. JAVMA 223(5), 639-644 PubMed.
  • Olivry T, Mueller R S, International Task Force on Canine Atopic Dermatitis (2003) Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of the pharmacotherapy of canine atopic dermatitis. Vet Dermatol 14(3), 121-146 PubMed.
  • Olivry T et al (2002) Cyclosporine decreases skin lesions and pruritus in dogs with atopic dermatitis: a blinded randomized prednisolone-controlled trial. Vet Dermatol 13(2), 77-87 PubMed.
  • Paradis M et al (2001) Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of marbofloxacin (Zeniquin) tablets for the treatment of canine pyoderma: an open clinical trial. Vet Dermatol 12(3), 163-169 PubMed.
  • Littlewood J D et al (1999) Clindamycin hydrochloride and clavulanate-amoxycillin in the treatment of canine superficial pyoderma. Vet Rec 144(24), 662-665 PubMed.
  • Paradis M (1999) New approaches to the treatment of canine demodicosis. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 29(6), 1425-1436 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Patel A, Forsythe P (2008) Small Animal Dermatology. Ed F Nind. Saunders Elsevier. pp 367.
  • Muller G H, Scott D W, Kirk R W, Miller W H, Griffin C E (2001) Muller & Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology. 6th edition. Saunders, Philadelphia. pp 1528.
  • Hesbitt G H & Ackerman L J (1998) Canine and Feline Dermatology. Trenton, New Jersey: Veterinary Learning Systems. pp 299-300.


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