ISSN 2398-2942      

Polyuria/polydispia (PU/PD)

icanis

Synonym(s): Excess thirst/excess urine production


Introduction

  • PUPD is a very common presenting sign in dogs. 
  • Polydipsia (PD) is defined as water intake exceeding 100 ml/kg/day: 
    • Water intake should be measured to confirm that PD is present. 
    • May present as a primary polydipsia with secondary polyuria (uncommon) or primary polyuria with secondary polydipsia (common).  
    • Primary polydipsia:  
  • Polyuria (PU) is defined as urine output exceeding 50 ml/kg/day: 
    • Primary polyuria. 
    • Decreased urine concentration ability which leads to compensatory polydipsia. 
    • Common. 
    • Due to a lack of ADH, renal ADH insensitivity or osmotic diuresis. 
Follow the diagnostic tree for Polyuria & polydipsia in dogs and cats.Print off the owner factsheet Increased water intake in dogs to give to your client.

History

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Clinical examination

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Differential diagnoses

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Diagnostic investigation

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Treatment

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Prognosis

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

Other sources of information

  • Feldman E C (2020) Polyuria/polydipsia. In: Clinical Veterinary Advisor Dogs and Cats. 2nd edn. Ed E. Côté. Elsevier. pp 812-814.
  • Barsanti J A, DiBartola S P & Finco D F (2000) Diagnostic approach to polyuria and polydipsia. In: Kirk’s Current Veterinary Therapy XIII. Ed J D Bonagura. Saunders. pp 831-835.  

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