Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Neurological examination

Contributor(s): Rodney Bagley, Kyle Braund, Simon Platt

Introduction

  • Clinical evaluation of animals suspected of having nervous system disease requires a fundamental knowledge of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.
  • More important is an understanding of how discrete elements within the nervous system are integrated, interrelate and interact for the animal to perform various normal functions.
  • Examination should be undertaken in a systematic manner so that no part of the examination is omitted.
Print off the owner factsheet Neurological examination Neurological examination to give to your client.

Functional Components of the Nervous System

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Goals of the Neurological Examination

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The Neurological Examination

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Ancillary diagnostic aids

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from VetMed Resource and PubMed.
  • Podell M (2004) Tremor, fasciculations, and movement disorders. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 34(6), 1435-1452 PubMed.
  • March P A, Knowles K & Thalhammer J G (1993) Reflex myoclonus in two labrador retriever littermates - a clinical, electrophysiological and pathological study. Prog Vet Neurol 4, 19-24.
  • Moore M P (1992) Approach to the patient with spinal disease. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 22, 751-780 PubMed.
  • Bagley R S (1992) Tremor syndromes in dogs - diagnosis and treatment. JSAP 33, 485-490.
  • Holliday T A (1991) Unilateral neglect (hemi-inattention) syndrome in dogs. Proc 9th Annual Vet Med Forum 5, 819-821.
  • Child G, Higgins R J & Cuddon P A (1990) Acquired scoliosis associated with hydromyelia and syringomyelia in two dogs. JAVMA 189, 909-912.
  • Chrisman C L (1990) Dancing doberman disease - clinical finding and prognosis. Prog in Vet Neurol 1, 83-90.
  • Colter S B (1990) Stupor and coma. Prog Vet Neurol 1, 137-145.
  • Hansen B (1990) Recognition of acute pain and distress in the dog. Proc 8th Annual Vet Med Forum 5, 773-776.
  • Bailey C S & Kitchell R L (1987) Cutaneous sensory testing in the dog. J Vet Intern Med 1, 128-135.
  • Fox J G, Averill D F, Hallett M & Schunk K (1984) Familial reflex myoclonus in labrador retrievers. Am J Vet Res 45, 2367-2370.
  • Holliday T A (1979/1980) Clinical signs of acute and chronic experimental lesions of the cerebellum. Vet Sci Comm 3, 259-277.
  • Knecht C D, Oliver J E, Redding R, Selcer R, Johnson G (1973) Narcolespy in a dog and a cat. JAVMA 162(12), 1052-1053 PubMed.
  • Breazile J E, Blaugh B S & Nail N (1966) Experimental study of canine distemper myoclonus. Am J Vet Res 27, 37-50.

Other sources of information

  • De Lahunta A, Glass E N (2008) Veterinary Neuroanatomy and Clinical Neurology. 3rd edn. Saunders.
  • Bagley R S (2005) Fundamental concepts of clinical neuroanatomy. In: Fundamentals of Veterinary Clinical Neurology. Wiley-Blackwell, pp 3-40.
  • Abramson C J (2004) Neurological disorders associated with cat and dog breeds. In: BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Neurology. BSAVA, GLoucester. pp 408-417.
  • Garosi L (2004) The neurological examination. In: BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Neurology.BSAVA, Gloucester, pp1-23.
  • Garosi L (2004) Lesion localisation and differential diagnosis. In: BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Neurology. BSAVA, Gloucester. pp 24-34.
  • Lorenz M D, Kornegay J N (2004) Handbook of Veterinary Neurology.Saunders.
  • Braund K G (2003) Neurological Syndromes. In: Braund's Clinical Neurology in Small Animals: Localization, Diagnosis and Treatment.Vite C H (ed). International Veterinary Information Service, Ithaca, NY (www.ivis.org).
  • Braund K G (1995) Localizing lesions to the brain based on neurological syndromes. Vet Med 90, 130-156.
  • Braund K G (1995) Using neurologic syndromes to localize lesions in the spinal cord. Vet Med 90, 157-167.
  • Braund K G (1995) Localizing lesions by recognizing neuropathic, myopathic, multifocal and paroxysmal syndromes. Vet Med 90, 168-179.
  • O'Brien D (1993) Brain damage and behaviour. Proc 11th Annual Vet Med Forum 5, 542-545.
  • Sims M H (1989) Hearing loss in small animals - occurrence and diagnosis. In: Current veterinary therapy X. Kirk R W. Philadelphia: W B Saunders. pp 805-811.
  • King A S (1987) Physiological and clinical anatomy of the domestic mammals. Oxford University Press.
  • Farrow B R H (1986) In: Generalized tremor syndrome. Kirk R W, Ed Current veterinary therapy IX.Philadelphia: W B Saunders. pp 800-801.
  • Kornegay J N (1986) Management of animals with neurologic disease. In: Neurologic disorders - contemporary issues in small animal practice. Kornegay J N, New York: Church Livingstone. p 3.
  • DeJong R N (1967) In: The neurologic examination. 3rd edn. New York: Harper and Row. p 6.


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