Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Stifle: luxation

Contributor(s): Sorrel Langley-Hobbs

Introduction

  • Rare.
  • Cause: major trauma/trapped foot when jumping → multiple ligamentous injuries (1 or more ligaments usually remain intact).
  • Signs: acute onset non-weight bearing pelvic limb lameness, very unstable joint, local swelling and pain.
  • Diagnosis: lameness, swelling, pain.
  • Treatment: surgical reconstruction - can be demanding.
  • Prognosis: variable with surgical repair - arthrodesis may be necessary.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Trauma.

Pathophysiology

  • Multiple ligamentous damage causing complete instability of stifle joint.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Keeley B, Glyde M, Guerin S, Doyle R (2007) Stifle joint luxation in the dog and cat: the use of temporary intraoperative transarticular pinning to facilitate joint reconstruction. Vet Comp Orthop Tramatol 20 (3), 198-203 PubMed.
  • Bruce W J (1998) Multiple ligamentous injuries of the canine stifle joint: a study of 12 cases. JSAP 39 (7), 333-340 PubMed.
  • Laing E J (1993) Collateral ligament injury and stifle luxation. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 23 (4), 845-853 PubMed.


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