Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Shoulder: luxation - traumatic

Contributor(s): Joseph Harari

Introduction

  • Uncommon, usually medial or lateral.
  • Cause: moderate to severe trauma.
  • Signs: acute onset, severe (usually non-weightbearing) forelimb lameness, typical posture.
  • Often reduces spontaneously on manipulation.
  • Treatment: dependent on direction of luxation/concurrent injury/whether recurrent.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Moderate to severe trauma: fall or knock, especially when dog turns at speed.

Predisposing factors

General
  • Breed.

Specific

  • Rupture of transverse humeral ligament - loss of cranial support allows cranial luxation.

Pathophysiology

  • Generally lateral or medial luxation of scapulohumeral joint caused by moderate to severe trauma.
  • Usually lateral or medial luxation caused by trauma to joint.
  • Rarely cranial (may be associated with loss of cranial joint support with rupture of transverse humeral ligament) or caudal.
  • Concurrent injuries always possible, eg fracture, brachial plexus involvement (especially lateral luxations).

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Vasseur P B (1983) Clinical results of surgical correction of shoulder luxation in dogs. JAVMA 182 (5), 503-505 PubMed.
  • Leighton R L & Kagan K G (1976) Surgical repair of lateral shoulder luxation. Mod Vet Pract 57 (9), 702-703 PubMed.
  • Leighton R L & Kagan K G (1976) Repair of medial shoulder luxation in dogs. Mod Vet Pract 57 (8), 604-606 PubMed.
  • Kavit A Y & Pellegrino R (1968) Surgical correction of scapulohumeral luxation in a dog. JAVMA 153 (2), 180-181 PubMed.


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