Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Tarsus: dorsal instability

Contributor(s): Joseph Harari, Sorrel Langley-Hobbs

Introduction

  • Less common than hyperextension injuries.
  • Cause: ruptured small ligaments of dorsal aspect of proximal intertarsal joint.
  • Signs: joint pain, relatively mild functional impairment - stable on weight-bearing as this aspect is on compression side of joint.
  • Medial or lateral instability is often present concurrently.
  • Treatment: small dogs - coaptation may be adequate; larger dogs - surgical stabilization favored.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • Tarsus is generally stable during weight-bearing phase of stride - functional impairment relatively mild.
  • Can affect the talocentral joint, middle intertarsal joint or tarsometatarsal joint.
  • There may be concurrent talocalcaneal luxation Talocalcaneus: luxation.
  • Occurs secondary to tarsal hyperextension.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Voss K, Keller M, Montavon P M (2004) Internal slinting of dorsal intertarsal and tarsometatarsal instabilities in dogs and cats with the ComPact UniLock 2.0/2.4™ System. VCOT 17 (3), 125-130 VetMedResource.
  • Guilliard M  J (2003) Dorsal tarsal instability in three racing greyhounds. JSAP 44 (9), 415-417 PubMed.
  • Matthiesen D T (1983) Tarsal injuries in the dog and cat. Comp Cont Ed Pract Vet 5 (7), 548-555 VetMedResource.


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