Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Congenital panhypopituitarism

Synonym(s): Pituitary dwarfism, congenital hyposomatotropism

Contributor(s): David Bruyette

Introduction

  • Cause: pituitary gland replaced by cystic dilation of Rathke's cleft or other developmental abnormalities.
  • Rare: most common in German Shepherd Dog as simple autosomal recessive.
  • Signs: depend on extent of pituitary involvement; appear normal at birth; retarded growth noticed around weaning, with one or more affected in a litter → proportionate dwarfs.
  • Diagnosis: radiology, hormone assays.
  • Treatment: hormone replacement therapy.
  • Prognosis: guarded - dwarfism usually permanent, mean age of survival 3 years despite treatment.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • 1° failure of differentiation of adenohypophsyeal cells into normal tropic hormone secreting cells → cyst formation with accumulation of inactive secretions forming cystic structures within gland.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Ramsey I D, Dennis R & Herrtage M E (1999) Concurrent central diabetes insipidus and panhypopituitarism in a German shepherd dog. JSAP 40 (6), 271-274 PubMed.
  • Van Herpen et al (1994) Production of antibodies to biosynthetic human growth hormone in the dog. Vet Rec 134 (7), 171 PubMed.
  • Rijnberk et al (1993) Disturbed release of growth hormone in mature dogs - a comparison with congenital growth hormone deficiency. Vet Rec 133 (22), 542-545 PubMed.
  • Randolph et al (1990) Delayed growth in two German Shepherd Dog littermates with normal serum concentrations of growth hormone, thyroxine and cortisol. JAVMA 196 (1), 77-83 PubMed.
  • Schmeitzel & Lothrop (1990) Hormonal abnormalities in Pomeranians with normal coat and in Pomeranians with growth hormone-responsive dermatosis. JAVMA 197 (10), 1333-1341 PubMed.


ADDED