Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Uterine prolapse: technique

Synonym(s): womb, replace, reduction, repair

Contributor(s): , Wendela Wapenaar

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Introduction

  • Techniques for replacement of a uterine prolapse can have many minor variations, however they are all broadly similar and have the same goal. That is: replacement of the large everted organ back into its correct anatomical position within the abdomen as quickly and gently as possible.
Print off the farmer factsheet on Uterine prolapse: aftercare to give to your clients.

Uses

Advantages

  • Simple.
  • Effective.

Disadvantages

  • Manually intensive.
  • Emergency situation.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Prognosis is generally favorable with treatment, dependent on time to treatment.
  • Survival rates are reported from 72 - 83%.
  • Subsequent conception rates are good, at 84%.
  • Calving-to-conception time is increased by 10-50 days.
  • Prognosis is more favorable in heifers, cows that had a live calf and animals not showing overt clinical signs of hypocalcemia Hypocalcemia and hypophosophatemia: overview.
There should be no reason why a non-damaged organ cannot be replaced, given the correct technique and enough patience.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Wapenaar W, Griffiths H, Lowes J & Brennan M (2011) Incidence of some diseases in connection with parturition in dairy cows. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 19, 341-353 PubMed.
  • Murphy A M & Dobson H (2002) Predisposition, subsequent fertility, and mortality of cows with uterine prolapse. Veterinary Record 151, 733-735 PubMed.
  • Correa M T, Erb H N & Scarlett J M (1992) A nested case-control study of uterine prolapse. Theriogenology 37, 939-945 VetMedResource.
  • Gardner I A, Reynolds J P, Risco C A & Hird D W (1990) Patterns of uterine prolapse in dairy cows and prognosis after treatment. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 197, 1021-1024 PubMed.
  • Jubb T F, Malmo J, Brightling P & Davies G M (1990) Survival and fertility after uterine prolapse in dairy cows. Australian Veterinary Journal 67, 22-24 PubMed.
  • Plenderleith B (1986) Prolapse of the uterus in the cow. In Practice 8, 14-15.
  • Risco C A, Reynolds J P & Hird D (1984) Uterine prolapse and hypocalcaemia in dairy cows. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 185, 1517-1519 PubMed.
  • Roine K & Saloniemi H (1978) Incidence of some diseases in connection with parturition in dairy cows. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 19, 341-353 PubMed.
  • Odegaard S A (1977) Uterine prolapse in dairy cows. A clinical study with special reference to incidence, recovery and subsequent fertility. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 63, 1-124 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Noakes D (2009) Arthur’s Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics. 9th edn. Saunders Elsevier.
  • Potter T (2008) Prolapse of the uterus in the cowUK veterinary Journal 13, 1-3.
  • White A (2007) Uterine prolapse in the cowUK Vet 12, 21-23.


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