Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Atresia recti/coli/ani correction

Contributor(s): Ash Phipps , Vetstream Ltd

Introduction

  • Atresia coli and atresia ani et recti are the congenital condition that results in the inability to pass fecal material .
  • Atresia ani is the congenital condition in which calves are born with either a small opening or no opening at all at the anus due to a failure of the anal membrane to break down. 
  • Atresia coli is the congenital condition in which calves are born with a section of the colon or large bowel that is incomplete (fibrous attachment between two segments) or absent. 
  • The condition of atresia ani is a heritable condition.
  • There is strong evidence to suggest that atresia coli is a heritable condition. It has also been suggested that early rectal palpation (fetus < 41 days of age) of cows and therefore subsequent damage to the amniotic vesicle and fetal blood supply to the intestine may cause the development of the congenital condition.
  • Atresia coli is commonly reported in dairy calves (especially Holstein Holstein Friesian Friesian calves- prevalence of 0.76%).
  • It is likely that atresia ani is the most common atresia encountered, however atresia coli and jejuni are more commonly reported in the literature.
  • Surgical correction is required to manage these conditions.
There are ethical and welfare concerns that should be considered prior to performing these procedures. Please see below for further information.

Uses

  • Surgical intervention for the correction of atresia of various segment of the intestinal tract.

Advantages

  • Surgical correction is required to correct the congenial conditions.

Disadvantages

  • Invasive procedure.
  • The overall success rate is poor for long term survival and future productivity (remaining in the herd).

Requirements

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Preparation

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Procedure

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Aftercare

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Prognosis

  • Atresia coli:
    • The overall success rate is poor for long term survival and future productivity (remaining in the herd).
      • Hence the need to seriously consider whether to embark on this surgery – both for welfare and economic reasons.
    • Calves have a guarded prognosis for survival from surgery with approximately 60% of calves not surviving surgery.
    • Calve that survive surgery have a poor prognosis for long term survival with approximately 40% of calves making it to adulthood. 
  • Atresia ani:
    • Commonly associated with fecal incontinence.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Azizi S, Mohammadi R & Mohammadpour I (2010) Surgical repair and management of congenital intestinal atresia in 68 calves. Veterinary Surgery 39 (1), pp 115-120.
  • Brenner J & Orgad U (2003) Epidemiological investigations of an outbreak of intestinal atresia in two Israeli dairy herds. Journal of veterinary medical science 65 (1), pp 141-143.
  • Constable P D, Shanks R D, Huhn J & Morin D E (1997) Evaluation of breed as a risk factor for atresia coli in cattle. Theriogenology 48 (5), pp 775-790 PubMed.
  • Syed M & Shanks R D (1992) Incidence of atresia coli and relationships among the affected calves born in one herd of Holstein cattle. Journal of dairy science 75 (5), pp 1357-1364.

Other sources of information

  • Parkinson T J, Vermunt J J & Malmo J (2010) Diseases of cattle in Australasia: a comprehensive textbook. New Zealand Veterinary Association Foundation for Continuing Education, Wellington, NZ.
  • Anderson D E & Rings M (2008) Current veterinary therapy: food animal practice. Elsevier Health Sciences. St Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • Divers T J & Peek S (2007) Rebhun's diseases of dairy cattle. Elsevier Health Sciences. St Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • Fubini S L & Ducharme N (2004) Farm animal surgery. Elsevier Health Sciences, St Louis, Missouri, USA.

Organisation(s)


 


ADDED