Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Endoscopy: displaced abomasum

Synonym(s): Endoscopy, Displaced Abomasum, Twisted Gut, Abomasal Volvulus, LDA, RDA

Contributor(s): Sotirios Karvountzis, Mike Reynolds

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Introduction

  • With the aid of small incisions (portals), vets are able to visualize the displaced abomasum and correct this condition endoscopically.
  • This minimally invasive technique also allows vets to carry out abdominal exploration and to identify concurrent disease, ie peritonitis, abscess, foreign bodies.
  • Endoscopic corrective techniques can be classified into the following two categories:
    1. One-step (or standing) techniques: preparation and correction is performed on the standing animal. Techniques include:
      • Christiansen: with this LDA technique, the abomasopexy point lies caudal to the xiphoid process.  
      • Meyer: with this LDA technique, the abomasopexy point lies cranial to the navel.
    2. Two-step technique: preparation is undertaken on the standing animal, but surgical correction is performed with the animal in dorsal recumbency:
      • Janowitz: this technique may be used to correct LDA or RDA and is useful for general abdominal exploration. The abomasopexy point lies cranially to the navel.

Uses

Advantages

  • Minimally invasive.
  • Reduced risk of infection.
  • Surgeon can fully visualize target organs.
  • Patient can join the herd at the next milking.
  • Research has indicated that LDA patients treated with endoscopic techniques, produced more milk post-operatively than their Grymer-Sterner corrected counterparts.
  • One-step (standing) techniques require 1 assistant only.
  • Unique selling point for veterinary practices that apply the technique.

Disadvantages

  • Purchase cost of the kit is equivalent to a good quality ultrasound scanner.
  • For a multi-branch practice with a limited number of surgeons trained on the technique, day to day management of the endoscopic equipment can present a challenge. Best results are achieved, when there is at least one endoscopic kit allocated per branch and a minimum of 2 trained surgeons in each branch.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • In the author’s experience, uncomplicated cases, will recover and return to normal yields within 10 days.
  • The speed or recovery of all other cases depends on the level of complications and nature of concurrent disease.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Karvountzis S (2017) Report on the comparison in post-operative milk production between two corrective techniques for left displacement of the abomasum in dairy cattle. Vet Rec.
  • Wittek T, Fürll M & Grosche A (2012) Peritoneal inflammatory response to surgical correction of left displaced abomasum using different techniques. Vet Rec 171 (23), 594 PubMed.
  • Jorritsma R, Westerlaan B, Bierma M P R & Frankena K (2008) Milk yield and survival of Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle after laparoscopic correction of left-displaced abomasum. Vet Rec 162 (23), 743-746 PubMed.
  • Newman K D, Harvey D & Roy J-P (2008) Minimally invasive field abomasopexy. Techniques for correction and fixation of left displacement of the abomasum in dairy cows. Vet Clin Food Anim Pract 24 (2), 359–382 PubMed.
  • Roy J-P, Harvey D, Bélanger A M & Buczinski S (2008) Comparison of 2 step laparoscopy guided abomasopexy versus omentopexy via right flank laparotomy for the treatment of dairy cows with left displacement of the abomasum in on farm settings. J Am Vet Med Assoc 232 (11), 1700-1706 PubMed.
  • Babkine M, Desrochers A, Bouré L & Hélie P (2006) Ventral laparoscopic abomasopexy on adult cows. Can Vet J 47 (4), 343–348 PubMed.
  • Mulon P-Y, Babkine N & Descrochers A (2006) Ventral laparoscopic abomasopexy in 18 cattle with displaced abomasum. Vet Surg 35 (4), 347–355 PubMed.
  • Seeger T, Kümper H, Failing K & Doll K (2006) Comparison of laparoscopic guided abomasopexy versus omentopexy via right flank laparotomy for the treatment of left abomasal displacement in dairy cows. Am J Vet Res 67 (3), 472-478 PubMed.
  • Babkine M & Desrochers A (2005) Laparoscopic surgery in adult cattle. Vet Clin Food Anim Pract 21 (1), 251–279 VetMedResource.
  • Boure L (2005) General principles of laparoscopy. Vet Clin Food Anim Pract 21 (1), 227–249 VetMedResource.
  • Newman K D, Anderson D E & Silveira F (2005) One step laparoscopic abomasopexy for correction of leftsided displacement of the abomasum in dairy cows. J Am Vet Med Assoc 227 (7), 1142-1147, 1090 PubMed.
  • Christiansen K (2000) Laparoskopisch kontrollierte Operation des nach links verlagerten Labmagens (Janowitz Operation) ohne Ablegen des Patienten. Für Studium und Praxis 66/118.
  • Janowitz H (1998) Laparoskopische Reposition und Fixation des nach links verlagerten Labmagens beim Rind. Terärtzliche Praxis 26 (G), 308-313.
  • Wilson A D & Ferguson J G (1984) Use of a Flexible Fiberoptic Laparoscope as a Diagnostic Aid in Cattle. Can Vet J 25 (6), 229-234 PubMed.


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