Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Neonatology: anesthesia of the neonatal calf

Contributor(s): Mike Reynolds , Alex Dugdale

Anesthesia and surgery overview

  • Calves younger than 2 months of age can be considered monogastric animals because they lack a fully functional rumen.
  • As in other species, concurrent immaturity in hepatic and renal function can lead to a prolonged duration of action of many injectable agents.
  • A large surface area to weight ratio will predispose calves to heat loss and so precautions such as the provision of blankets or heat pads should be considered to prevent hypothermia. This is exacerbated by vasodilation from inhalation anesthetic agents.

Induction of anesthesia

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Maintenance of anesthesia

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Recovery from anesthesia

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A note regarding analgesia

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Seddighi R & Doherty T J (2016) Field sedation and anesthesia of ruminants. Vet Clin FoodAnim 32, 553–570 PubMed.
  • Hodgkinson O & Dawson L (2007) Practical anesthesia and analgesia in sheep, goats and calves. In Practice 29, 596-603 VetMedResource.
  • Mulun P Y & Desrochers A (2005) Surgical Abdomen of the Calf. Vet Clin Food Anim 21, 101–132.
  • Greene S A (2003) Protocols for anesthesia of cattle. Vet Clin Food Anim 19, 679–693 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Clarke KW & Trim C M (2013) Anesthesia in cattle. In: Veterinary Anesthesia. 11th edn. pp. 313-340


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