Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Mastitis: vaccination

Contributor(s): Jonathan Statham , James Breen

Bishopton Veterinary Group logoRAFT logoUniversity of Nottingham logo

Introduction

  • The ‘One Health’ agenda is driving the need to reduce the reliance on antimicrobials in food production.
  • Mastitis treatment with antimicrobials represents a significant use of antimicrobials in the dairy industry .
  • Consumer concerns over potential residues in milk also drives the search for other solutions for mastitis control. This has been expressed as national mastitis control plans, eg AHDB Dairy MCP (UK), Countdown Downunder (Aus), SAMM Plan (NZ) among others. 

Issues surrounding vaccination

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Vaccination against E. coli and coliform bacteria

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Vaccination against Staph aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS)

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Vaccination against Strep uberis

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Commercially available vaccines in the UK

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Summary

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Bradley A J, Breen J E, Payne B et al (2015) An investigation of the efficacy of a polyvalent mastitis vaccine using different vaccination regimens under UK field conditions. J Dairy Sci 98 (3), 1706-20 PubMed.
  • Schukken Y H, Bronzo V, Locatelli C, Pollera C et al (2014) Efficacy of vaccination on Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci intramammary infection dynamics in 2 dairy herds. J Dairy Sci 97 (8), 5250–5264 PubMed.
  • Statham J (2014) The role of vaccination in mastitis control. British Mastitis Conference proceedings, 33-43 VetMedResource.
  • Zadoks R N (2013) An update on Streptococcus uberis mastitis and control. Cattle Pract 21 (2) 181-187 VetMedResource.
  • Garcia-Alvarez L, Holden M T G, Lindsay H, Webb C R (2011) Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with a novel mecA homologue in human and bovine populations in the UK and Denmark: a descriptive study. Lancet Infect Dis 11 (8), 595-603 PubMed.
  • Pereira U P, Oliveira D G, Mesquita L R et al (2011) Efficacy of Staphylococcus aureus vaccines for bovine mastitis: a systematic review. Vet Microbiol 148 (2-4), 117–124 PubMed.
  • Breen J E, Green M J & Bradley A J (2009) Quarter and cow risk factors associated with the occurrence of clinical mastitis in dairy cows in the United Kingdom. J Dairy Sci 92 (6), 2551–2561 PubMed.
  • Pérez M M, Prenafeta A, Valle J et al (2009) Protection from Staphylococcus aureus mastitis associated with poly-N-acetyl β-1,6 glucosamine specific antibody production using biofilm-embedded bacteria. Vaccine 27 (17), 2379-2386 PubMed.
  • Prenafeta A, March R, Foix A et al (2009) Study of the humoral immunological response after vaccination with a Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-embedded bacterin in dairy cows: possible role of the exopolysaccharide specific antibody production in the protection from Staphylococcus aureus induced mastitis. Vet Immun Immunopathol 134 (3-4), 208-217 PubMed.
  • Green M J, Bradley A J, Medley G J & Browne W J (2007) Cow, farm and management factors during the dry period that determine the rate of clinical mastitis after calving. J Dairy Sci 90 (8), 3764-3776 PubMed.
  • Ruegg P (2005) Evaluating the effectiveness of mastitis vaccines. Milk Money 3, 21-28 SemanticsScholar.
  • Bradley A (2002) Bovine mastitis: an evolving disease. Vet J 164 (2), 116-128 PubMed.
  • Bradley A J & Green M J (2001) Adaptation of Escherichia coli to the bovine mammary gland. J Clin Microbiol 39 (5), 1845–1849 PubMed.
  • Zadoks R N, Allore H G, Barkema H W, Sampimon O C et al (2001) Cow and quarter-level risk factors for Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus mastitis. J Dairy Sci 84 (1), 2649–2663 PubMed.
  • Bradley A J & Green M J (2000) A study of the incidence and significance of intramammary enterobacterial infections acquired during the dry period. J Dairy Sci 83 (9), 1957–1965 PubMed.
  • Hogan J S, Smith K L, Todhunter D A & Schoenberger P S (1992) Field trial to determine efficacy of an Escherichia coli J5 mastitis vaccine. J Dairy Sci 75 (1), 78-84 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Compton C & McDougall S (2014) Patterns of antibiotic sales to dairy farms in the Waikato region of New Zealand. In: Proceedings of The Society of Dairy Cattle Veterinarians of the NZVA Annual Conference. pp 361-368.
  • Bronzo V, Locatelli C, Scaccabarozzi L, Casula A et al (2012) Bacterial Biofilm. In: WBC Proceedings Lisbon.
  • Carpenter E, Leigh J & Prosser C (2010) Induction of an IgA response to Streptococcus uberis protects against direct challenge with immunising strain in dairy cows. In: Proceedings 5th IDF Mastitis Conference. pp 275-282.


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