ISSN 2398-2993      

LDAs: which technique to use?

obovis

Synonym(s): Left displaced abomasum, Abomasal volvulus


Introduction

This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the most popular LDA corrective techniques, including: All the techniques require the use of local anesthesia, however the paramedian and toggle techniques also require restraint and/or sedation so that the animal can be placed in dorsal recumbency.

Notes about this article

  • This article describes the approximate duration of each technique and the figure given includes examination of the patient and completion of the surgical procedure.
  • Deflation of the abomasum:
    • Defined as "passive" when the inflated organ deflates without any intervention from the surgeon.
    • Defined as "active" when it is necessary for the surgeon to assist with deflation by massaging the organ.
  • It has been assumed that regardless of technique, all cases will receive post-operative oral rehydration therapy Fluid therapy: overview with or without transfaunation.
  • This article has been summarized as a table LDA techniques comparison table.

Right laparotomy (Hannover)

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Left and right laparotomy

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Utrecht

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Paramedian

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Endoscopy (Christiansen)

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Toggle

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Conclusion

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Lyons N A, Cooke J S, Wilson S, Van Winden S C et al (2014) Relationships between metabolite and IGF1 concentrations with fertility and production outcomes following left abomasal displacement. Vet Rec 174 (26), 657 PubMed.
  • Stengärde L, Hultgren J, Tråvén M et al (2012) Risk factors for displaced abomasum or ketosis in Swedish dairy herds. Prev Vet Med 103 (4), 280–286 PubMed.
  • Wittek T, Fürll M & Grosche A (2012) Peritoneal inflammatory response to surgical correction of left displaced abomasum using different techniques. Vet Rec 171 (23), 594 PubMed.
  • Mees K (2011) Effects of a cow drink on the convalescence of dairy cows after surgical correction of left abomasal displacement using the “Roll & Toggle” approach according to Grymer and Sterner. Doctoral Thesis Department of Veterinary Medicine University of Berlin, 129 VetMedResource.
  • Ontsouka E C, Niederberger M, Steiner A et al (2010) Binding sites of muscarinic and adrenergic receptors in gastrointestinal tissues of dairy cows suffering from left displacement of the abomasum, Vet J 186 (3), 32837 PubMed.
  • Braun U, Blessing S, Lejeune B, Hässig M (2007) Ultrasonography of the omasum in cows with various gastrointestinal diseases. The Vet Rec 160 (25), 865-9 PubMed.
  • Holtenius P & Holtenius K (2007) A model to estimate insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 11, 49:29 PubMed.
  • Itoh N, Egawa M, Kitazawa T et al (2006) A new method for detecting the abomasal position and characteristics of movement at the onset of the left displacement of the abomasum in cows. J Vet Med A Physiol Pathol Clin Med 53 (7), 3758 PubMed.
  • Christiansen K (2004) Laparoskopisch kontrollierte Operation des nach links verlagerten Labmagens (Janowitz Operation) ohne Ablegen des Patienten. Tierarztl Prax Ausg G 32 (2), 118-121 ResearchGate.
  • Rager K D, George L W, House J K & DePeters E J (2004) Evaluation of rumen transfaunation after surgical correction of leftsided displacement of the abomasum in cows. JAVMA 225 (6), 915-920 PubMed.
  • Steven C L, Van Winden & Kuiper R (2003) Left displacement of the abomasum in dairy cattle: recent developments in epidemiological and etiological aspect. Vet Res 34 (1), 47–56 PubMed.
  • Sterner K & Grymer J (2002) 20 years’ experience with the Grymer/Sterner® toggle suture technique for LDA repair: Improvements in materials and methods. XXII WBC Hannover, Germany.
  • Lee I, Yamagishi N, Oboshi K & Yamada H (2002) Left Paramedian Abomasopexy in Cattle. J Vet Sci 3 (1), 59-60 PubMed.
  • Kobayashi Y, Boyd C K, McCormack B L & Lucy M C (2002) Reduced insulin-like growth factor-I after acute feed restriction in lactating dairy cows is independent of changes in growth hormone receptor 1A mRNA. J Dairy Sci 85 (4), 748–754 PubMed.
  • Geishauser T, Reiche D & Schemann M (1998) In vitro motility disorders associated with displaced abomasum in dairy cows. Neurogastroenterol Mot 10 (5), 395-401 PubMed.
  • Janowitz H (1998) Laparoskopische Reposition und Fixation des nach links verlagerten Labmagens beim Rind. Tierärtzliche Praxis 26 (G), 308-313.
  • Fubini S L, Ducharme N G, Erb H N & Sheils R L (1992) A comparison in 101 dairy cows of right paralumbar fossa omentopexy and right paramedian abomasopexy for treatment of left displacement of the abomasum. Can Vet J 33 (5), 318-324 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Turner et al (2013) Techniques in Large Animal Surgery. 4th edn. Lea & Febiger, USA.
  • Weaver et al (2005) Bovine Surgery and Lameness. 2nd edn. Blackwell, USA.

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