Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Dairy herd biosecurity plans: diseases to focus on

Contributor(s): Sophie Mahendran , Keith Cutler

What do we mean by biosecurity?

  • Biosecurity: measures and activities designed to protect a farm from the entry and spread of pests and diseases.
    • Whereas biocontainment refers to measures and activities designed to reduce the spread of pests and disease within a herd.
  • Farm biosecurity is the responsibility of the owner, and that of every person visiting or working on the farm, including vets.
    • The owner/ tenant should ensure all persons visiting or working on the farm, understand the importance of biosecurity and engage with it.
  • Ensuring good biosecurity helps to reduce the serious and long term financial impacts that the introduction of infectious disease could have on a farm.
  • Biosecurity can be implemented at three different time points:
    • Before travelling to the farm, eg disease testing animals before buying them in Herd health accreditation schemes  Biosecurity
    • At the border to the farm, eg Foot dipping Foot dipping, preventing nose-to-nose contact between neighbouring holdings animals.
    • On-farm, eg quarantine isolation of bought-in animals.
  • Biosecurity becomes particularly crucial during periods of emergency disease outbreaks such as Foot and Mouth Disease Foot and Mouth Disease Farmers guide to UK notifiable diseases.
  • A key part of biosecurity is the inclusion of a management plan within the farm Herd health Herd health plan.
    • Knowledge of the current health status of the herd is key to this.
    • Use of risk assessments for identifying potential concerns or problems on the farm can be useful.
  • This article focuses on biosecurity measures relevant to UK farms.

Diseases

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Vaccination

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Buying in animals

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Accreditation Schemes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Non- animal based biosecurity measures

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMed Resource.
  • Richter V, Lebl K, Baumgartner W, Obritzhauser et al (2017) A systematic worldwide review of the direct monetary losses in cattle due to bovine viral diarrhoea virus infection. The Veterinary Journal, 220, pp 80-87 PubMed
  • Adkins A, Brouwer A, Simons R R L, Smith R P et al (2016) Development of risk-based trading farm scoring system to assist with the control of bovine tuberculosis in cattle in England and Wales. Preventive Veterinary Medicine, (123), pp 32-38.
  • Newcomer B W & Givens D (2016) Diagnosis and Control of Viral Diseases of Reproductive Importance: Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis and Bovine Viral Diarrhea. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice 32 (2), pp 425-441 PubMed.
  • Sibley R (2010) Biosecurity in the dairy herd. In Practice 32, pp 274-280.
  • Sibley R (2006) Developing health plans for the dairy herd. In Practice, 28, pp 114-121.

Organisation(s)


ADDED