Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Anesthetic machines: overview

Synonym(s): Anaesthesia

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd , Jo Murrell

Introduction

  • The administration of an inhalation anesthetic requires a gas source, eg oxygen, a source of volatile agent and a breathing system.
  • Before the volatile agent is delivered to the patient, it must turn from a liquid to a vapor. This vapor must be diluted to a safe concentration.
  • It is also desirable to be able to control the depth of anesthesia quickly and accurately.

Oxygen supply

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Nitrous oxide

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Vaporizers

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Machine checks

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMed Resource.
  • Steffey E P (2002) Recent advances in inhalation anesthesia. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 18 (1), 159-168 PubMed.
  • Eicker S W & Cuvelliez S (1990) Equipment for inhalation anesthesia. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 6 (3), 543-551 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Taylor P M & Clarke K W (2005) Handbook of Equine Anaesthesia. 3rd edn. W B Saunders, London, UK.
  • Hall L W & Clarke K W (1983) Veterinary Anesthesia. 8th edn. Bailliere Tindall, London. pp 162-169.


ADDED