Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Urinary bladder: eversion and prolapse

Contributor(s): Sophie Mahendran , Paul Wood

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Introduction

This is a rare occurrence in cattle.
  • Cause: late gestation in conjunction with vaginal prolapse, or following prolonged tenesmus, eg parturition.
  • Signs: bladder mucosa everts through urethral orifice or through a tear in the vaginal mucosa.
  • Diagnosis: clinical signs.
  • Treatment: replace under epidural anesthesia.
  • Prognosis: guarded.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • True bladder eversion occurs through the urethral orifice.
An everted bladder does NOT contain urine!
  • Bladder prolapse usually occurs following a laceration in the wall of the vagina during parturition, generally due to prolonged tenesmus.
    • The prolapsed bladder generally fills with urine.
    • Bladder prolapse can also be associated with grade II and III vaginal prolapse.

Timecourse

  • Hours to days.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Azawi O I D M & Al-Hyani O H (2012) "Vaginal and cervical prolapse complicated with herniation of urinary bladder in a cow: a case report". Asian pacific journal of reproduction 1 (3), 231–32.
  • Miesner, Matt D  & Anderson D (2008) "Management of uterine and vaginal prolapse in the bovine". Veterinary clinics of north america: food animal practice 24 (2), 409–19.

Other sources of information

  • Divers & Thomas J (2008) “Chapter 10 - urinary tract diseases.” In: Rebhun’s Diseases of Dairy Cattle. 2nd edn. Eds: Thomas J Divers & Simon F Peek. Saint Louis: W B. Saunders. pp 447–66.


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