Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Agalactiae: primary

Synonym(s): Lactation failure

Contributor(s): Ash Phipps , Neil Paton

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Introduction

  • Agalactiae (also known as lactation failure) is the failure to produce mammary secretion.
  • The etiology is divided into primary and secondary.
    • This article will provide an overview of primary agalactiae in cattle.
Information on secondary agalactiae can be found by following the link in the related content list to the side of this screen.
  • Cause: developmental - aplasia or dysplasia of mammary tissue or endocrinologic problem.
  • Signs: the predominant clinical sign associated with primary agalactia is failure to produce mammary secretions post parturition.
  • Diagnosis: based on the clinical sign of failure to produce mammary secretions post parturition and exclusion of other potential causes (secondary agalactiae). 
  • Treatment: no treatment.
  • Prognosis: guarded.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Primary agalactia is caused by either:
    • Aplasia or dysplasia of the mammary glands, or
    • An endocrine abnormality that affects milk production.
  • Primary agalactiae is often due to an unknown etiology, however is it likely to be due to a dysfunction of the pituitary (and hormone production)/ ovarian / mammary axis. 

Timecourse

  • Immediately after parturition.

Epidemiology

  • Sporadic condition.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

Other sources of information

  • Bradford P S (1990) Large animal internal medicine. The CV Mosby Company, St. Louis, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Toronto. pp 195-196.
  • Haskell Scott R R (2011) Blackwell's Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Ruminant. John Wiley & Sons. pp 458-459.


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