Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Cowpox virus

Synonym(s): orthopoxvirus, CPV

Contributor(s): Veronica Fowler , Tammy Hassel

Introduction

Classification

Taxonomy

  • Family: poxviridae.
  • Sub-family: chordopoxvirinae.
  • Genus: orthopoxvirus.
  • Virus: cowpox virus (CPV).

Active Forms

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Clinical Effects

Epidemiology

Transmission

  • CPV can gain entry via bites or skin wounds.
  • CPV is spread between cattle usually via milker's hands or contaminated milking equipment. This is why the incidence of disease is higher in dairy cattle.

Pathological effects

  • Incubation period is 3-7 days.
  • CPV causes characteristic mild, localised clinical signs:
    • Scabby teat and udder lesions/ulcers-dairy cattle.
    • Scabby lesions on the scrotum-bulls.
    • Scabby lesions in the mouth-calves.
    • Many cattle will be affected.
    • Secondary mastitis.
  • Infection with CPV stimulates antibody production which is protective for approximately 2 years.

Control

Control via animal

  • Isolate infected animals and milk these animals last.

Control via environment

  • Disinfection of milking equipment.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Tack D M & Reynolds M G (2011) Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated with Companion Animals. Animals (Basel) 1 (4), 377-95 PubMed.
  • Hazel S M, Bennett M, Chantrey J, Bown K, Cavanagh R, Jones T R, Baxby D & Begon M (2000) A longitudinal study of an endemic disease in its wildlife reservoir: cowpox and wild rodents. Epidemiol Infect 124 (3), 551-62 PubMed.
  • Chantrey J, Meyer H, Baxby D, Begon M, Bown KJ, Hazel SM, Jones T, Montgomery W I & Bennett M (1999) Cowpox: reservoir hosts and geographic range. Epidemiol Infect 122 (3), 455-6 PubMed.
  • Crouch A C, Baxby D, McCracken C M, Gaskell R M & Bennett M (1995) Serological evidence
    for the reservoir hosts of cowpox virus in British wildlife.
    Epidemiol Infect 115 (1), 185-91 PubMed.

ADDED